Monday, 09 September 2019

7:30 AM — 6:00 PM

Registration

Location: Cedar Prefunction

7:30 — 8:30 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: Room 261-264

8:30 — 9:00 AM

Welcome Remarks and Industry Overview:
Shipper Pain Points — Separating Perception From Reality

Location: Room 250-253

Senior Editor,

Technology,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Eric Johnson

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Peter Tirschwell

In this kickoff to LogTech 2019, the JOC will outline the findings of research into which areas shippers truly struggle with, and which types of service provider — whether software company, 3PL, or carrier — are best equipped to manage those pain points.

9:00 — 9:30 AM

Keynote Address

Location: Room 250-253

Technology is often presented as the answer to all shipper ills. But often, shippers juggle an array of problems for which they see technology as a solution, not the solution. The challenge of keeping up with the latest and greatest software bumps up against the need to keep the business moving. And logistics practitioners believe the ability of their teams to innovate in creative ways sometimes can eliminate the need to invest in new systems. In the kickoff keynote to LogTech 2019, Abir Thakurta, vice president of supply chain for home furnishings retailer Haverty’s, will discuss how a shipper decides where and when to invest. He’ll also discuss what value technology does and doesn’t bring to an international logistics organization, and what technology mosts interests him going forward.

Senior Editor,

Technology,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Introduction

Eric Johnson

Vice President,
Global Supply Chain,
Havertys

Keynote Speaker

Abir Thakurta

9:30 — 10:15 AM

The Future Is Not History:
Learning From the Past While Not Repeating It

Location: Room 250-253

Senior Editor,

Technology,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

CEO,
Oney Consulting

Panelist

Jack Oney

Strategic Advisor,
Slync.io

Panelist

John Urban

CEO,
3Gtms

Panelist

Mitch Weseley

It’s certainly instructive to look at the current infusion of capital and entrepreneurial verve into the logistics industry through the lens of history. But it’s also not advised to dwell on the past when considering what changes will take place. Three highly regarded veterans of logistics technology talk about what excites them in the current market, the parallels of the past, and what lessons can be learned for current buyers of software.

10:15 — 10:45 AM

Networking Break

Location: Room 261-264

10:45 — 11:45 AM

The Dividing Line: Tech Ushers in a New Age of Logistics Customer Acquisition and Retention

Location: Room 250-253

Senior Editor,

Technology,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Co-Founder and CEO,
Shippabo

Panelist

Nina Luu

Co-Founder and CEO,
Simpliship

Panelist

Cory Margand

CEO,
Kontainers

Panelist

Graham Parker

Co-Founder and CEO,
Haven

Panelist

Matthew Tillman

Logistics software can roughly be broken into two buckets: technology to be used for a single enterprise and technology designed to scale across enterprise. Nowhere is this split more apparent than in the plethora of startups selling themselves as digital freight forwarders or brokers (the single enterprise approach) and those selling software-as-a-service (SaaS) products. At the root of which approach a technology company takes is a key question software providers in all industries face: reducing the cost of customer acquisition and retention. There’s also the issue of these two models colliding in some instances. A diverse panel of technology providers will discuss the merits of these two competitive approaches.

11:45 AM — 12:30 PM

Tech as an Enabler of New Capital Strategies

Location: Room 250-253

If shippers, carriers, and 3PLs could know the exact location and conditions of their goods at all times, would that change the risk profile of financing a global shipment? Would banks be more apt to finance such shipments earlier, on better terms, or at all? Alternatively, would shippers be compelled by an offering from a freight forwarder or tech platform that bundled day-to-day logistics services with capital offerings? The collision of tech with traditional freight services is opening up new opportunities when it comes to financing international cargo moves. This isn’t just logistics service providers offering credit to customers, but in some cases also providing the capital to buy the goods. This panel will look at specific use cases where visibility or single-platform services might change the way banks and financiers look at global trade.

Senior Editor,

Technology,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Vice President,
Flexport

Panelist

Dan Glazer

 Chief Financial Officer, Baseballism

Panelist

Jonathan Loomis 

Head of Trade Finance
Product Development,
North America,
Maersk Group

Panelist

Bhavani Rawla

CEO,
Arviem AG

Panelist

Stefan Reidy

12:30  — 1:45 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Room 261-264 and 254-255

1:45  — 2:30 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

Where the Rubber Meets the Ocean:
How Technology Is Smoothing Freight Interchange Between International and Domestic Modes

Location: Room 250-253

Billions of dollars have been invested in logistics software over the last few years, but an asymmetry persists in what that funding targets. While shippers generally want fewer systems and want to manage more modes on single platforms, investment in systems tends to focus on domestic or international freight. In this session, a diverse range of experts in the logistics and transportation space will discuss how they view the importance of technology to their operations, and, more broadly, whether technology can be a true bridge to managing domestic and international freight.

President,

Garner Enterprises

Session Chair

Hilary Garner

Associate,
Edison Partners

Panelist

Toni Ann Careccio

CEO,

Manning’s Truck Brokerage

Panelist

Charley Dehoney

Vice President,
Global Logistics
and Corporate Training,
Lakeshore Learning Materials

Panelist

Daniel Gardner

President,
KTI

Panelist

Michael Kroul

Location: Room 256-257

Automated Procurement:
Will Bots Do Our Freight Buying?

Senior Editor,

Technology,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

General Manager
and Vice President,
Xeneta

Panelist

Florian Dussler

Director, Imports,
Sealink International Inc.

Panelist

Carolyn Glynn

CEO,
Keelvar

Panelist

Alan Holland

CEO,
Freightos

Panelist

Zvi Schreiber

Logistics practitioners aren’t robots. They make decisions based on intuition, experience, data, and current dynamics, synthesizing those components in a way that computers can’t — yet. But there is a school of thought that humans on their own simply aren’t capable of synthesizing the volume of data required to make key decisions around areas such as route and mode optimization, and procurement. The theory is that programs — designed to account for an exponential number of variables, and able to learn new variables on the fly — eventually will enable companies to make smarter, more sober decisions about where to source freight capacity across transportation modes. Wrapped into this discussion is whether shippers need to be more agile when it comes to the broader discipline of freight procurement — whether they need to build the capability to source on the fly rather than rely on long-term contracts. This panel of procurement experts will discuss how advances in automation are changing the way procurement might be conducted in the coming years, where people fit into the equation, and whether shippers and logistics service providers are better off letting the bots do the buying.

2:30  — 3:15 PM

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

The Expanding Edges of TMS

Location: Room 250-253

Senior Editor,
Trucking,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

William Cassidy

Marketing Manager,
Cerasis

Panelist

Adam Robinson

Vice President,
Research,
Gartner

Panelist

Bart de Muynck

Chief Marketing Officer,
Winmore

Panelist

John Golob

By most analysts’ counts, there are more than 1,000 transportation management system providers in the market, and likely many more if you consider proprietary systems used by freight forwarders and brokers. With so many choices in the market, it can be highly confusing to potential buyers looking to invest in their first system, or to upgrade from an existing one. But an important factor in those considerations is that the nature of TMS is changing. Or rather, it’s expanding to include management of more modes, to incorporate new ways of procuring, such as digital freight matching, and is blurring into other processes, such as customer relationship management systems. This session will examine the ways in which TMS is becoming a force to unify more decision-making and execution processes across transportation modes, including parcel and global, and touching other internal systems for logistics services providers to enable them to sell more effectively to their customers. JOC Senior Editor Bill Cassidy will lead this lively discussion of some of the industry’s most interesting vendors that are enabling these expansions.

Location: Room 256-257

How Logistics-Focused VCs
Are Changing the 1 in 10 Paradigm

Senior Editor,

Technology,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,

IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Partner,
Schematic Ventures

Panelist

Julian Counihan

Co-Founder,

The WESEE Collective

Panelist

Kevin Meredith

CEO and Co-Founder,

ZEBOX

Panelist

Matthieu Somekh

Director, Investments,
Prologis Ventures

Panelist

Earnest Sweat

The going theory with venture capital investment is that only some bets will pan out, and an even smaller number will pan out in a big way, creating so-called unicorns that forever shape the way business is transacted. There is little doubt that VC groups have fallen in love with the enterprise B2B space in recent years, and a primary focus of that infatuation is logistics and transportation. The size of the market, the fragmentation, and the relative lack of automation are all indicators of great promise. But more recently a select group of VC investors — from the bedrock venture firms in Silicon Valley and independent early stage investors in New York to corporate venture arms of established logistics companies — have started to change the math. Their growing expertise, industry networks, and experience is leading to highly informed decisions that are more likely to connect. This development comes as even the most optimistic venture investors understand that it’s unlikely there will be single “winners” in any category of logistics software, and that industry transformation will take longer than in other industries because of the dispersed and complicated nature of global logistics. In this session, a group of such investors representing the gamut of incubation stage, seed stage, early stage, and corporate will discuss this changing equation and the ramifications on logistics industry software buyers.

3:15  — 3:45 PM

Networking Break

Location: Room 261-264

3:45  — 4:15 PM

Freight Forwarders Never Left the Game

Location: Room 250-253

Director Product Marketing, Winmore

Session Introduction

Mark Gamble

Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

President and CEO,
Canaan Group 

Panelist

Patrick Lo

Senior Vice President
and Chief Information Officer,
Expeditors
 

Panelist

Chris McClincy

The rise of the digital freight forwarder concept has brought into stark relief the degree to which established forwarders have innovated. But the reality is that most forwarders didn't need a kickstart to invest in technology. Most successful ones have long invested in systems and people to keep a necessary competitive edge. If the digital forwarder model has done anything, it's amplified the need for forwarders to explain the investments they've made to eke out margins in a highly fragmented landscape. In this rapid-fire session, two veterans with established logistics providers — one mid-sized and one small — explain how they view innovation in the current environment, and how established providers view the potential threat of new digitally oriented counterparts.

Sponsored by:

Winmore.png

4:15  — 5:15 PM

The Rise of Cross Border E-Commerce

Location: Room 250-253

Co-Founder & CEO,
Shipz Inc.,
and Founder and Host,
"Let's Talk Supply Chain" Podcast

Session Chair

Sarah Barnes-Humphrey

Vice President,
Marketing,
SEKO Logistics

Panelist

Brian Bourke

Co-Founder,
Easyship

Panelist

Augustin Ceyrac

President,
BPE Global

Panelist

Beth Pride

Founder and CEO,
FlavorCloud

Panelist

Rathna Sharad

E-commerce has indelibly changed the landscape of goods movement by giving end consumers greater choice and faster delivery. But it’s also placed expectations — sometimes unreasonable ones — on retailers and suppliers. These expectations get more complex when you factor in the rise of cross-border e-commerce. Whereas international sales online are relatively easy to consummate, the supply chains that underpin those sales are complicated, and the companies receiving those orders often are unprepared to deal with those complications. But, as with every other corner of logistics, technology providers and tech-minded 3PLs are stepping in to ease the burden on suppliers and e-commerce sellers. They are providing platforms that automate duty calculations, logistics costs, and some link directly with freight forwarders to smooth the coordination of goods movement tied to online orders. This panel will explore how systems, connected through APIs, are changing the way international sellers operate, and the impact that has on ocean freight, airfreight, and trade compliance.

5:15 — 6:45 PM

Networking Reception

Location: Room 261-264

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.